Privacy Practices

This notice describes how medical information about you may be used and disclosed, and how you can get access to this information.
Please review it carefully.

Our Commitment

Our principal goal at Pathema GX is to offer high-quality laboratory services. In order to perform these services, we collect, create, use and disclose information about you. We are dedicated to keeping your health information private, in accordance with federal and state law. As required by the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA“), we provide you with this notice of our legal duties with respect to health information. We are required to follow the terms of this notice currently or any revision to it that is in effect. We reserve the right to make changes to this notice as allowed by law. Changes to our privacy practices will apply to all health information we maintain.
If we change this notice, you can access the revised notice using one of these options:

How We May Use and Disclose Your Health Information

We may use your health information and disclose it to appropriate persons, authorities, and agencies, as allowed by federal and state law. We may do this without your written permission for the following purposes:

Treatment.

We can use your health information and share it with other professionals who are treating you.
Example: A doctor treating you for an injury asks another doctor about your overall health condition.

Billing for Services.

We can use and share your health information to bill and get payment from health plans or other entities.
Example: We give information about you to your health insurance plan so it will pay for your services.

Health Care Operations.

We can use and share your health information to run our practice, improve your care, and contact you when necessary.
Example: We use health information about you to manage your treatment and services.

Other Ways We May Disclose Your Health Information

We are allowed or required to share your information in other ways – usually in ways that contribute to the public good, such as public health and research. We have to meet many conditions in the law before we can share your information for these purposes.

Help with public health and safety issues.

We can share health information about you for certain situations such as:

  • Preventing disease
  • Helping with product recalls
  • Reporting adverse reactions to medications
  • Reporting suspected abuse, neglect, or domestic violence
  • Preventing or reducing a serious threat to anyone’s health or safety

Health Care Oversight.

We may disclose your health information to authorities and agencies for oversight activities allowed by law, including audits, investigations, inspections, licensing, disciplinary actions, or legal proceedings. These activities are necessary for oversight of the health care system, government programs, and civil rights laws.

Response to Legal Proceedings.

We may disclose your health information in the course of certain legal proceedings. For example, we may disclose your information in response to a court order.

Death.

We may disclose your health information to coroners, medical examiners (for example, to find out the cause of death) and funeral directors so they can carry out their duties.

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FAQ

Cancer

  • Why should I get tested if I already know I have a family history of cancer?

    Knowing your family history is an important first step, but testing for a hereditary cancer risk gives you and your healthcare professional a more accurate picture of your risk, which enables the best choices to be made for preventive care.

  • Why should I get tested if already have cancer?

    Testing for a hereditary cancer reveals your risk for developing a second primary cancer, thus helping your doctor determine the best type of preventive care. You can then make your family members aware of their hereditary risk as well.

  • Is testing recommended for everyone?

    While testing is the most accurate way to determine your risk of hereditary cancer, if you have had cancer and/or cancer runs in your family, your primary physician may already direct or recommend that you get tested so that such health professional has a better understanding of any other potential health risks you may have.

    To decide if you might benefit from hereditary-cancer genetic testing, simply take the simple, 30-second Pathema GX Labs quiz. Based on the results, you can discuss your risk of cancer with your healthcare professional and ask for further evaluation.

  • How do I get tested?

    First, ask your healthcare professional if testing is right for you. If so, and if approved by your doctor, your genetic testing kit will be sent to you by Priority Mail. Simply follow instructions on how to use the enclosed noninvasive Q-tip oral swab, then mail back your DNA specimen in the pre-paid package.

  • How long does it take to get the test results?

    The results will be sent to your trusted healthcare professional within 2-3 weeks of the day your sample arrives at the lab.

  • How do I receive my test results?

    The results will be sent to your healthcare professional. Pathema GX labs can, however, give you (along with your physician) access to the education portal, which will help you understand the results. In many cases, a genetic counselor is provided if ordered by your doctor.

  • How do I know if my insurance plan covers genetic testing?

    Most insurance carriers cover genetic-testing services for hereditary cancer. Although each case is unique, the average patient pays little to nothing out of pocket.

Cardio

  • Why should I get tested if I already know I have a family history of heart disease?

    Knowing your family history is an important first step, but testing can give you a more accurate picture of your risk for a hereditary cardiovascular disease. This helps you and your healthcare professional understand your risk so you can make the best choices for preventive care.

  • Why should I get tested if already have heart disease?

    Testing for a hereditary cardiovascular disease will enable you and your doctor to inform other members of your family about their risk of inheriting heart disease. This information can permit both you and family members make the best choices for preventive care.

  • Is testing recommended for everyone?

    While testing is the most accurate way to determine the risk of hereditary cardiovascular disease, only people who have heart disease in their family or their personal history need to be tested. If you have heart disease and/or it runs in your family, your primary physician may already direct or recommend that you get tested so that such health professional has a better understanding of any other potential health risks you may have.

    To determine if you could benefit from genetic testing for hereditary heart disease, simply take the simple 30-second Pathema GX Labs quiz. It will give you the information you need to discuss your risk of heart disease with your healthcare professional and to request further evaluation.

  • How do I get tested?

    First, ask your healthcare professional if testing is right for you. If so and if approved by your doctor, your genetic-testing kit will be sent to you by Priority Mail. Simply follow instructions on how to use the enclosed noninvasive Q-tip oral swab, then mail back your DNA specimen in the pre-paid package.

  • How long does it take to get the test results?

    The results will be sent to your trusted healthcare professional within 2-3 weeks of the day your sample arrives at the lab.

  • How do I know if my insurance plan covers genetic testing?

    Most insurance carriers cover genetic-testing services for hereditary cardiovascular disease. Although each case is unique, the average patient pays little to nothing out of pocket.

PGX

  • What is pharmacogenomics?

    Pharmacogenomics is the study of how your genes affect your response to drugs. This relatively new field combines pharmacology (the science of drugs) and genomics (the study of genes and their functions) to develop effective, safe medications and doses that are tailored to your unique genetic makeup.

  • How do I get tested?

    Ask your healthcare professional if pharmacogenomics testing is right for you. If so, and if approved by your doctor, your genetic-testing kit will be sent to you by Priority Mail. Simply follow instructions on how to use the enclosed noninvasive Q-tip oral swab, then mail back your DNA specimen in the pre-paid package.

  • How long does it take to get the test results?

    The results will be sent to your trusted healthcare professional within 2-3 weeks of the day your sample arrives at the lab.

  • How do I receive my test results?

    The results will be sent to your healthcare professional. Pathema GX labs can, however, give you (along with your physician) access to the education portal, which will help you understand the results. In many cases, a genetic counselor is provided if ordered by your doctor.

  • How do I know if my insurance plan covers genetic testing?

    Most insurance carriers cover genetic-testing services for pharmacogenomics. Although each case is unique, the average patient pays little to nothing out of pocket.